Saturday, January 1, 2005

2004 Magna Awards

MAGNAVERDE


posted Jan 01, 2005 12:52 AM Jan 01, 2005 12:52 AM
Yes, it's that time of year again, when everyone else is out having a good time, drinking champagne & wearing sparkly hats & kissing people they can't stand the other 364 nights of the year, and here I am again, slaving over a hot keyboard, just in case there's an amazing last minute entry for this year's Magna Awards. Fortunately for me, this year there weren't any.

So without further ado, here are our award winners for 2OO4, selected by our one-man panel of judges, who wishes to remain anonymous. Naturally, the decision of the judge is final.

P.S.:
If you don't see your name in lights (and don't feel bad, my name isn't up there either), there's always next year. But remember, if you don't post pictures, you can't win. Anyway, a hearty congratulations to all of our 2OO4 winners, and thanks to everyone who entered.
This message has been edited. Last edited by: MAGNAVERDE, Jan 01, 2005 01:24 AM Jan 01, 2005 01:24 AM

Posts: 661 | Location: Chicago IL | Registered: Sep 18, 2002


MAGNAVERDE


posted Jan 01, 2005 12:56 AM Jan 01, 2005 12:56 AM
Most unique--Mike Jenkins

If you want proof that designers are born, not made, all you have to do is look at Mike Jenkins. An amateur with no formal design training, Mike showed up out of the blue last summer with a few shots of his amazing Cowboy Baroque lodge and the board went crazy. There are lots of western/lodge/rustic houses around, but many of them are off-the shelf designs full of the usual catalogue tchotchkes. Mike’s is the real deal. He not only designed and built his own house, he also designed everything in it. Mike is the decorating equivalent of a one man band, a sort of cross between William Molesworth and Dr. Seuss. The massive log bed with its iron silhouette of a roundup through the woods, the cowhide lamps, the river rock shower that includes a tree branch--everything comes out of one man’s creative brain. One of these days, Mike will get a spread in a glossy magazine and the rest of the world will discover him. In the meantime, he’s our hero. Who says men can’t decorate?
This message has been edited. Last edited by: MAGNAVERDE, Jan 01, 2005 01:26 AM Jan 01, 2005 01:26 AM

Posts: 661 | Location: Chicago IL | Registered: Sep 18, 2002




MAGNAVERDE


posted Jan 01, 2005 12:57 AM Jan 01, 2005 12:57 AM
Most improved--Lostinwisconsin

To watch those makeover shows, you’d think that painting a boring off-white room red was a decorating miracle cure. Instead, all that happened was that red rooms themselves became predictable. Lostinwisconsin had just such an unremarkable room to work with, full of awkward beams & angles, but instead of using all-over color to minimize the quirks, Lostinwisconsin highlighted them. Yes, she used red, but only as a bold accent on a single panel, which she contrasted with banana yellow walls and a chunky beam painted lapis blue. In the process she gave her once-dull room the graphic punch of a Mondrian painting. Lost? I’d say this woman knew exactly where she was going.
This message has been edited. Last edited by: MAGNAVERDE, Jan 01, 2005 01:16 AM Jan 01, 2005 01:16 AM

Posts: 661 | Location: Chicago IL | Registered: Sep 18, 2002



MAGNAVERDE

posted Jan 01, 2005 01:00 AM Jan 01, 2005 01:00 AM
Most elegant--kw2

Back in the 195Os, the great decorator Dorothy Draper wrote a book called “Decorating is Fun.“ The problem is some people have so much fun they don’t know when to quit and their rooms suffer as a result. This beautifully restrained dining room, by kw2, demonstrates the truth of Edith Wharton’s advice in “The Decoration of Houses”, written exactly one century ago.

"Where the walls are treated in an architectural manner, with a well-designed dado and cornice...the intervening wall spaces may be tinted in a uniform color and left unornamented. If the fundamental lines are right very little decorative detail is needed to complete the effect; whereas when the lines are wrong, no overlaying of ornamental odds and ends, in the way of pictures, bric-a-brac and other improvised expedients will conceal the structural deficiencies".
Kw2 shows how elegant & alluring simplicity can be. If this room were a woman, it would be Audrey Hepburn.
This message has been edited. Last edited by: MAGNAVERDE, Jan 01, 2005 01:22 AM Jan 01, 2005 01:22 AM

Posts: 661 | Location: Chicago IL | Registered: Sep 18, 2002



MAGNAVERDE


posted Jan 01, 2005 01:03 AM Jan 01, 2005 01:03 AM
Most inviting--Bella

Bella has it all: a handsome, well-proportioned house, taste, originality, confidence, and most important, the strength to drag furniture from room to room all by herself. Remember the old quote about success being 1% inspiration and 99% perspiration? They were talking about Bella. Still, it’s that one per cent that makes the difference between Bella and a moving crew, and in Bella’s case, what a difference it is. We saw Bella’s public rooms go from a crisp, contrasty 199Os look to one that’s warmer and better suited to the age of her already appealing house. It’s in this bedroom, however, that Bella’s talent shows best. Traditional without being dull, romantic without being cloying, it proves that handsome effects do not depend on the size of a room. With her subtle, effective use of lighting, Bella has achieved what many new houses--with their expensive built-in lighting systems never do: a real feeling of welcome & intimacy.
This message has been edited. Last edited by: MAGNAVERDE, Jan 01, 2005 01:07 AM Jan 01, 2005 01:07 AM

Posts: 661 | Location: Chicago IL | Registered: Sep 18, 2002

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